Meet the 2020-2021 Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Graduate Fellows and Learn about our New Books in the DRC Series!

Hosted by the Sweetland Center for Writing, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) is an online, community webspace by and for scholars and teachers working in computers and writing and digital rhetoric. It is also the home of a digital book series with the UM Press.  

This fall, the DRC welcomed its eighth cohort of graduate student Fellows. The program aims to recognize graduate students around the country currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.

DRC Fellows commit to attending monthly online team meetings to plan projects that extend the DRC website and its contributions to the community of computers and writing. They work independently and collaboratively to complete two projects within the year of their term. 

Last year’s fellows responded with resilience and creativity to the curves thrown by 2020, curating thoughtful, responsive content in light of the COVID-19 pandemic and the uprisings and activism in response to police violence that marked the spring and summer months. These materials include a blog carnival on “Rhetoric and Communication in the Time of COVID-19: A Global Pandemic and Digital Rhetoric” that brought together nine responses to teaching, writing, and living in “COVID times,” in locations as widespread as China, Ghana, Canada, and the U.S. The fellows also crafted an affirmation of the principles and practices of the Black Lives Matter movement in a “Statement against Anti-Black Violence” that responded to these events from the perspective of digital rhetoricians “attuned to how technologies and their many facets are deployed in and for the projects of anti-Blackness, settler colonialism, and white supremacy.” Other projects over the course of the year — to name just a couple! — included a blog carnival on “Digital Community Building as Social Justice Praxis”, and a brand new limited podcast series titled “On the Job” that interviews faculty just completing their first year in a new position and graduate students on the job market in writing studies.

Keep your eyes open for upcoming collaborative projects from our new fellows, including a blog carnival focused around empathy, a multimedia series on Black audio work, and a crowdsourced digital rhetoric syllabus repository.

The 2020-2021 fellows are:

D’Arcee Charington Neal is a PhD student in Rhetoric and Composition at The Ohio State University, where he works at the intersection of disability and Black Digital Media. His research focuses on rhetorical displays of ableism, Afrofuturistic production, and audionarratology. Currently he is composing the opening chapter for his audio novela about a black wheelchair-user/turned digital ghost in future Neo Orleans, and can be followed on Twitter at @drchairington.

Jianfen Chen is a PhD student in the Rhetoric and Composition program at Purdue University. Currently, she teaches Introductory Composition at Purdue. Before that, she worked as a writing consultant in the Purdue Writing Lab. Her research interests include public rhetoric, digital rhetoric, risk communication, intercultural communication, and professional and technical communication. Jianfen is also a certified Chinese/English translator and interpreter. You can follow her on Twitter at @sugejianfen.

Danielle Koepke is a second year PhD student studying Public Rhetorics and Community Engagement at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee. She has an MA in Rhetoric and Composition, and her research areas include multimodal composing practices, digital literacies, and feminist theories. She is also interested in applications of social justice pedagogies in her teaching. You can follow Danielle on Twitter at @koepke_marie13.

Sarah Hughes is a PhD candidate in the Joint Program in English and Education at the University of Michigan, where she also teaches in the English Department Writing Program. Her research interests include digital rhetoric, gender and discourse, and gaming studies. Her dissertation project explores how women use multimodal discourse—grammatically, narratively, and visually—to navigate online gaming ecologies.

Kimberly Williams is a second-year doctoral student in the English Department at the University of Florida where her work encompasses Black love and sound studies across multimedia and literature. You can find her published and upcoming work in Journal of the Society for American Music, Sounding Out! and Standpoints: Black Feminist Knowledges published by Virginia Tech Press.

Nupoor Ranade is a Ph.D. student in the Communication, Rhetoric and Digital Media program at the North Carolina State University. Her research focuses on audience analysis, digital rhetoric, user experience and information design, primarily in the field of technical communication and artificial intelligence. Her research experience and partnerships with the industry help her bridge gaps of knowledge that she then brings to her pedagogical practices. She is interested in exploring interdisciplinary collaborative work which helps us redefine the term audience.

New and Forthcoming
Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Books!

This past year has been a busy one for the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series, an imprint of the University of Michigan Press. 2020 saw four new book projects go into production on topics as varied as writing workflows, makerspaces, screen composing, and a 100-year history of “new media” pedagogy. You can read below about the first one off the press this past December, and look for the others in 2021! 

Writing Workflows: Beyond Word Processing by Tim Lockridge (Miami University) and Derek Van Ittersum (Kent State University) argues that a workflow-focused approach to composing can help writers and writing instructors evaluate and adopt the technologies that make writing possible, highlighting the role of writing tools as full-fledged actors in writing activity. The book draws on case studies of professional writers who deliberately and carefully construct writing workflows that lead them to make critical evaluations of their tools, their purpose(s), and the contexts in which they compose. Through a type of reflection the authors call “workflow thinking,” writers can look at their processes and ask how tools shape their habits—and how a change in tools might offer new ways of thinking and writing. The book also introduces a practice the authors call “workflow mapping,” which helps writers trace their tool preferences across time and imagine how new technologies might fit in. In addition to its extensive use of images, hyperlinks, screen casts, and other digital artifacts to enhance meaning, Writing Workflows incorporates innovative audio overlays to, quite literally, give voice to the research participants. Writing Workflows is winner of the 2018 Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Prize.

Meet the 2019-2020 Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Graduate Fellows & New Books

Hosted by the Sweetland Center for Writing, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) is an online, community webspace by and for scholars and teachers working in computers and writing and digital rhetoric. It is also the home of a digital book series with the U-M Press.  

This summer, the DRC welcomed its seventh cohort of graduate student Fellows. The program aims to recognize graduate students around the country currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.

DRC Fellows commit to attending monthly online team meetings to plan projects that extend the DRC website and its contributions to the community of computers and writing. They work independently and collaboratively to complete two projects within the year of their term. Last year’s Fellows hosted robust blog carnivals on “Discerning Digital Rhetorics’ Futures” and “Multimodal Design and Social Advocacy”, as well as publishing five Webtexts of the Month reviews covering topics from teaching with Wikipedia, to a new online forum for young scholars, to a journal of undergraduate multimedia publications. In November, two of our fellows collaborated on an interactive video chronicling their experiences attending the annual Watson Conference on Rhetoric and Composition and curating a series of conference session reviews. Our new fellows have already jumped into the mix with a blog carnival on “Digital Community Building as Social Justice Praxis”, fresh off the (digital) press.

This year’s fellows are:

Dana Comi, University of Kansas

Dana Comi is a PhD student in the Rhetoric and Composition program at the University of Kansas, where she currently teaches first year composition and technical communication courses. Her research interests include Rhetorical Genre Studies (RGS), human-centered design, and digital rhetoric. Currently, she researches neighborhoods that design their own Internet infrastructure as rhetorical access-building. You can follow her on Twitter at @cat_comi.

Wilfredo Flores, Michigan State University

Wilfredo Flores—or Wil—is a third-year PhD student in the Department of Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State University. His research deploys ideas from platform studies and cultural rhetorics and qualitative methods to examine how queer people talk about their sexual health on Twitter. You can read more at wilfredoflores.org, and he tweets at @willflowers.

McKinley Green, University of Minnesota

McKinley Green (he/him/his pronouns) is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric and Scientific & Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota, where he teaches classes in technical and professional communication, first-year writing, and visual rhetoric. His interests are located at intersections of technology, rhetoric, and theories of social justice. You can learn more about his teaching and research at mckinleytgreen.com.

Jialei Jiang, Indiana University of Pennsylvania

Jialei Jiang is a PhD candidate in Composition and Applied Linguistics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she also teaches first-year composition (FYC) and research writing courses. Her research interests include new materialist theories, digital composition, and public rhetoric. She is interested in exploring the intersection between multimodal pedagogy and public rhetoric advocacy. Jialei’s dissertation focuses on examining the material and affective design of multimodal campaigns in FYC classrooms.

Soyeon Lee, University of Houston

Soyeon Lee is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric, Composition, and Pedagogy in the English department at the University of Houston. Her research interests include transnational literacy studies, digital rhetoric, community engagement, and environmental risk communication. She has worked on representing the experiences and literate lives of flood-affected immigrants living in the Gulf of Mexico coastal cities in the aftermath of disasters.

Nupoor Ranade, North Carolina State University

Nupoor Ranade is a Ph.D. student in the Communication, Rhetoric and Digital Media program at the North Carolina State University. Her research focuses on audience analysis, digital rhetoric, user experience and information design, primarily in the field of technical communication and artificial intelligence. Her research experience and partnerships with the industry help her bridge gaps of knowledge that she then brings to her pedagogical practices. She is interested in exploring interdisciplinary collaborative work which helps us redefine the term audience.

TWO NEW BOOKS from the Sweetland DRC Book Series

This winter, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series, an imprint of the U-M Press, published two new books that move the study of digital writing and rhetoric forward in important ways.

Developing Writers in Higher Education: A Longitudinal Study, edited by Anne Ruggles Gere (University of Michigan), director of Sweetland 2008-2019, provides a comprehensive study of college students’ writerly development across their undergraduate years. Drawing on extensive qualitative and quantitative data gathered from 169 U-M undergraduate students over six years, Developing Writers traces the multiple paths taken by student writers as they learn to write for various purposes in multiple disciplines, leading them to new levels of competence in their academic and professional pursuits. The book has both a companion website that presents additional materials for a broad audience, and an online repository that makes the study’s data available to a research audience.

Rhetorical Code Studies: Discovering Arguments in and around Code by Kevin Brock (University of South Carolina) offers an exploration of software code as meaningful communication through which amateur and professional software developers construct arguments. His book considers examples ranging from large, well-known projects like Mozilla Firefox to small-scale programs like the “FizzBuzz” test common in many programming job interviews, and includes interactive components that allow readers to test out some of the book’s arguments for themselves. Rhetorical Code Studies is winner of the 2017 Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Prize.

Meet the DRC Fellows & New DRC Books

Hosted by the Sweetland Center for Writing, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) is an online, community webspace by and for scholars and teachers working in computers and writing and digital rhetoric. It is also the home of a digital book series with the U-M Press.

This summer, the DRC welcomed its sixth cohort of graduate student Fellows. The program aims to recognize graduate students around the country currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.

DRC Fellows commit to attending monthly online team meetings to plan projects that extend the DRC website and its contributions to the community of computers and writing. They work independently and collaboratively to complete two projects within the year of their term. Last year’s Fellows hosted robust blog carnivals on “Material and Digital Rhetorics: Openings for Feminist Action” and “Rhetorics and Ethics of Smart Technologies and Artificial Intelligence,” as well as publishing six Webtext of the Month reviews covering topics from digital feminist publishing to a Google Chrome extension addressing gendered writing challenges in email to a virtual roundtable on wearable and embodied technologies. Our new fellows have already jumped into the mix with a blog carnival on “Discerning Digital Rhetorics’ Futures”, and session reviews from the 2018 Watson conference are being edited as we go to press.

The 2018-2019 fellows are…

Lauren Garskie, Bowling Green State University
Lauren Garskie is a PhD candidate in the Rhetoric & Writing Program at Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include design literacies, digital rhetoric, and multimodality. Lauren’s dissertation, situated in a newly built space designed to foster cross-disciplinary collaboration at BGSU, examines how collaboration is understood and enacted/affected by a space.

Angela Glotfelter, Miami University of Ohio
Angela Glotfelter is a PhD student in the Composition and Rhetoric program at Miami University of Ohio, where she currently teaches and takes courses in digital writing and rhetoric. Currently, she researches how content creators navigate the complex systems created by algorithms and other actors to achieve success. You can follow her on twitter at @amglotfelter.

Whitney Lew James, Texas Christian University
Whitney Lew James is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric and Composition at Texas Christian University. Currently serving as Assistant Director of TCU’s Center for Digital Expression, her research interests include translingual and multimodal pedagogies, digital rhetoric, and Disability Studies. You can learn more about Whitney’s research and teaching here: whitneylewjames.com. She tweets at @whitney_tweets.

Jialei Jiang, Indiana University of Pennsylvania
Jialei Jiang is a PhD candidate in Composition and Applied Linguistics at Indiana University of Pennsylvania, where she also teaches first-year composition (FYC) and research writing courses. Her research interests include new materialist theories, digital composition, and public rhetoric. She is interested in exploring the intersection between multimodal pedagogy and public rhetoric advocacy. Jialei’s dissertation focuses on examining the material and affective design of multimodal campaigns in FYC classrooms.

Jason Tham, University of Minnesota
Jason Tham is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota––Twin Cities. His current research focuses on making and design thinking in writing pedagogy, multimodality, and emerging technologies such as wearables and mixed reality. He tweets at @JasonCKTham.

Katie Walkup, University of South Florida
Katie Walkup is a PhD student in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of South Florida. Her research interests are rhetoric of health and medicine, digital rhetoric, and writing program administration. Her current research project looks at the role of self-narrative in mental health literacy. She tweets at @klwalkup.

NEW BOOK from the Sweetland DRC Book Series

This October, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series, an imprint of the U-M Press, had the pleasure of publishing its fourth book, Sites of Translation: What Multilinguals Can Teach Us about Digital Writing and Rhetoric  by Laura Gonzales of the University of Texas at El Paso, and a DRC Graduate Fellow from 2013-2015. Winner of the 2016 Sweetland Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Prize, Sites of Translation offers a groundbreaking study of the inventive intellectual work performed by multilingual communicators who translate information in academic and professional spaces. As her reviewers write, Gonzales’s study “spans multiple lines of inquiry (comparative studies, multilingual studies, and digital rhetorics)” to create “a text that is at once polyvocal and accessibly written.” Further, “the substantial and significant data (nearly 3,000 translations and nearly 5,800 second-tier codes) provides an excellent example for analyzing larger data sets that connect with ethnographic storytelling,” providing “insightful analysis from experiences that often go overlooked.”

OF NOTE: The Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series publication Rhizcomics: Rhetoric, Technology, and New Media Composition, by Jason Helms (Texas Christian University), received the 2018 Kairos Best Webtext Award! Presented annually by the premier scholarly journal in digital rhetoric, this award recognizes outstanding webtexts that “take advantage of the Web as a medium to present information in ways that traditional scholarly texts cannot.”

Meet DRC Fellows & New DRC Books

MEET THE 2017-2018 DRC GRADUATE FELLOWS

Hosted by the Sweetland Center for Writing, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) is an online, community webspace by and for scholars and teachers working in computers and writing and digital rhetoric, and a digital book series with the U-M Press.

This summer, the DRC welcomed its fifth cohort of graduate student Fellows. The program aims to recognize graduate students around the country currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.

DRC Fellows commit to attending monthly online team meetings to plan projects that extend the DRC website and its contributions to the community of computers and writing. They work independently and collaboratively to complete two projects within the year of their term. Last year’s Fellows  hosted robust blog carnivals on “The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Publishing” and “Teaching Digital Rhetoric after the Election,” as well as publishing Webtext of the Month reviews covering topics from Pokémon Go and collaborative games to fact-checking and “fake news” to the multimodal podcast S-Town. Our new fellows have already jumped into the mix with a webtext review of an interactive mapping tool in white collar crime risk zones and a selection of session reviews from the 2017 Feminisms and Rhetorics conference. Look for posts in their current blog carnival on “Material and Digital Rhetorics: Openings for Feminist Action” taking place now.

This year’s fellows are:

Lauren Brentnell, Michigan State University
Lauren Brentnell is a PhD student in Writing, Rhetoric, and American Cultures at Michigan State University. Her research focus is in trauma studies, examining how trauma survivors use nonlinear, multimodal, and digital forms of composing during the recovery process. She currently works as a research assistant with the Corpus and Repository of Writing (CROW), a multi-institutional research project devoted to creating a new digital archive to support new forms of writing research. She tweets at @RhetoricNSpice. Read Lauren’s introduction

Carleigh Davis, East Carolina University
Carleigh Davis is a PhD student in Rhetoric, Writing, and Professional Communication at East Carolina University. Her research focuses on using Memetic Rhetorical Theory to explore the intersections of rhetoric and social justice in digital spaces. She is currently using this theory in her dissertation as a way of examining the proliferation of fake news items through social media networks. She tweets at @CarleighJoan. Read Carleigh’s introduction

 

Brandee Easter, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Brandee Easter is a doctoral student in the Composition and Rhetoric program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on intersections of gender and digital rhetoric. She also enjoys talking about videogames, graphic design, and her dogs. Read Brandee’s introduction

 

 

 

Lauren Garskie, Bowling Green State University
Lauren Garskie is a PhD student in the Rhetoric & Writing Program at Bowling Green State University. Her research interests include design, literacies, digital rhetoric, and multimodality. Lauren’s dissertation analyzes the rhetorical uses of a new collaborative space on BGSU’s campus and the influence of such space on its users and a design thinking process. Read Lauren’s introduction

 

Kristin Ravel, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Kristin Ravel is pursuing her PhD in English with a concentration in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). Kristin’s dissertation explores ethics and digital multimodality in the composition classroom through, what she is calling, a pedagogy of techno-social relationality. More specifically, a pedagogy of techno-social relationality, motivated by feminist theory on ethics, explores how relationality ought to be understood as taking place online in an inseparable blend of the technical and social. She tweets at @kristin_ravel. Read Kristin’s introduction

Jason Tham, University of Minnesota
Jason is a PhD candidate in Rhetoric and Scientific and Technical Communication at the University of Minnesota––Twin Cities. His current research focuses on making and design thinking in writing pedagogy, multimodality, and emerging technologies such as wearables and mixed reality. Read Jason’s introduction

 

 

NEW BOOK from the Sweetland DRC Book Series

This February, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series, part of the Digital Culture Books imprint of the U-M Press, had the pleasure of publishing its third book, the digital monograph Rhizcomics: Rhetoric, Technology, and New Media Composition by Jason Helms of Texas Christian University. As the book’s front matter indicates, Rhizcomics explores comics as a new “idiom” for understanding the relationship between texts and images, as well as a “rhetorically complex medium” in its own right, “capable of nuanced scholarly arguments.” What’s more, in its playful, interactive interface (“Is it a book, a project, a work, an experience?”), Rhizcomics, as one reviewer puts it, “breaks new ground in how scholars of rhetoric and composition present theory and research.” Helms “dazzles his readers by disrupting our expectations. We are invited to not only follow Helms’ argument but to blaze our own way through on a multimodal journey, taking inviting detours, playing with animations, and even reading out of order. Rhizcomics is a visual and verbal feast, much as comics are, and is both argument and metaphor. I’ve never seen anything like it.”

OF NOTE: The Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series publication, Digital Samaritans: Rhetorical Delivery and Engagement in the Digital Humanities by Jim Ridolfo (University of Kentucky), received the 2017 Conference on College Composition and Communication Research Impact Award! Presented annually by the premier professional organization in writing studies, this award recognizes “the empirical research publication in the previous two years that most advances the mission of the organization or the needs of the profession.”

Book Unbound

Book Unbound

The Book Unbound project addresses  questions of how to bring digital publication of humanities scholarship to a public, multi-layered audience.  Supported  by  a Humanities Collaboratory grant, a College of Literature, Science, and the Arts program that offers funding to innovative, collaborative research projects in the humanities, brings together a multi-disciplinary team. . Heading the project for its first year is Sweetland Center for Writing Director Anne Gere, supported by a team including Sweetland’s Associate Director Naomi Silver; Sweetland Graduate Research Assistants Emily Wilson, Naitnaphit Limlamai, and Adrienne Raw; and faculty, graduate and undergraduate students from across campus. Nicola Terrenato (Classical Studies) will be the project’s principal investigator in its second year. Matthew Solomon (Screen Arts and Cultures) is a Faculty Associate on the project as is Kentaro Toyama (School of Information), who will advise on user experience. Charles Watkinson, Director of the University of Michigan Press and a key originator of the project, and David Stone of the Kelsey Museum are Project Associates on the team.

Focused around three scholarly texts currently in development, Book Unbound explores how digital publication enables different experiences for different users, offering access for a general reading public in one “layer,” an enhanced scholarly publication for academic readers in another “layer,” and entry to a database of primary materials for future researchers in yet another “layer.” Texts in development are

  • an archaeological publication of a second online volume from the Gabii Project, in which 3D imaging software is being used to document an ancient Roman city,
  • and a cinema and media studies publication presenting a multimedia archive edition of the unproduced Orson Welles screenplay “The Heart of Darkness.”

The third text is Sweetland’s writing studies publication, Developing Writers: A Longitudinal Study of Undergraduates, a massive longitudinal study of the multiple and uneven ways students develop as writers in college. The text documents student writing development in print and digital media, and addresses public questions about the value of higher education. In addition to its development through Book Unbound, it is being considered for publication in print and online through the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative book series with the University of Michigan Press.

Digital publications of all texts in the project are facilitated through Fulcrum, a publishing platform being developed at the University of Michigan with support from the Andrew W. Mellon Foundation. Jeremy Morse and Jon McGlone, of the Michigan Publishing Technologies team, are heading up the project’s work on Fulcrum.

Meet the 2016-2017 Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Graduate Fellows

Hosted by the Sweetland Center for Writing, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative (DRC) is an online, community webspace by and for scholars and teachers working in computers and writing and digital rhetoric, and a digital book series with the U-M Press.

This summer, the DRC welcomed its fourth cohort of graduate student Fellows! The program aims to recognize graduate students around the country currently working in digital rhetoric who want practical experience in online publishing and website development. Fellows are selected on a yearly basis by the editors and board of the DRC, and receive an annual stipend of $500 as well as recognition on the DRC website.

DRC Fellows commit to attending monthly online team meetings to plan projects that extend the DRC website and its contributions to the community of computers and writing. They work independently and collaboratively to complete two projects within the year of their term. Last year’s Fellows [LINK to Previous Fellows page] hosted robust blog carnivals on “Digital Writing in K-12 Communities,” “Makerspaces and Writing,” and “Cripping Digital Rhetoric and Technology,” as well as publishing Webtext of the Month reviews covering topics from Pinterest to crafting to digital annotation tools. Our new fellows have already jumped into the mix with a webtext review of Pokémon Go and a selection of session reviews from the 2016 Watson Conference on Rhetoric and Composition. Look for posts in their current blog carnival on “The Past, Present, and Future of Digital Publishing,” featuring DRC authors and other digital publishers and editors, taking place now!

This year’s fellows are:

david-coadDavid Coad, University of California, Davis
David T. Coad is a PhD Candidate at the University of California, Davis, studying Education with a designated emphasis in Writing, Rhetoric, and Composition Studies. He uses qualitative methods to research social media as rhetoric, as literate practice, and as a means of community and identity building in contexts such as FYC courses and academic culture. For more info: davidcoad.com, Twitter: @dcoad.

 

brandydeiterlyBrandy Deiterle, University of Central Florida
Brandy Dieterle is a doctoral student in the Texts & Technology program at the University of Central Florida (UCF). At UCF, Brandy has been a graduate student tutor in the University Writing Center and has taught first-year composition courses. As a teacher, Brandy encourages students to think of writing and literacy as both self representation and identity forming. Her research is focused on identity and self representation, gender identity and representation, multimodality and new media, and digital rhetoric

 

easter-1Brandee Easter, University of Wisconsin-Madison
Brandee Easter is a doctoral student in the Composition and Rhetoric program at the University of Wisconsin-Madison. Her research focuses on intersections of gender and digital rhetoric. She also enjoys talking about videogames, graphic design, and her dogs.

 

 

 

jason-lutherJason Luther, Syracuse University
Jason Luther is a PhD candidate in the Composition and Cultural Rhetoric Program at Syracuse University. His work focuses on self-publishing histories, DIY culture, and multimodal, writing (counter)publics. As a former writing center director, Jason is influenced by pedagogies beyond the classroom, incorporating differentiated learning models that make use of a variety of technologies, both old and new, in the classroom and out. His dissertation examines how the last 20 years have affected authorial desire and rhetorical agency for DIY publishers in the United States and Canada and what those changes mean for the teaching of writing and rhetoric. Sometimes he talks about this and more at taxomania.org and @jwluther.

kristin-ravelKristin Ravel, University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee
Kristin Ravel is pursuing her PhD in English with a concentration in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Wisconsin-Milwaukee (UWM). Kristin’s dissertation explores ethics and digital multimodality in the composition classroom through, what she is calling, a pedagogy of techno-social relationality. More specifically, a pedagogy of techno-social relationality, motivated by feminist theory on ethics, explores how relationality ought to be understood as taking place online in an inseparable blend of the technical and social. She tweets at @kristin_ravel.

 

sara-westSara West, University of Arkansas
Sara West is a PhD candidate specializing in Rhetoric and Composition at the University of Arkansas. Her research addresses how student-users compose in anonymous and/or ephemeral social media spaces, and how composition and technical communication researchers can begin to navigate these spaces as well. At the University of Arkansas, Sara has taught courses in first-year writing, advanced composition, and technical writing; she has also designed and taught first-year composition courses focusing on writing for the web and writing for social media. She’s also a semi-competent yogi and runner, a cat enthusiast, a lover of lists and plans, and an avid TV fan. Her website is saraofthewest.com, and she tweets at @saraofthewest.

New Books from the DRC Book Series!

Last fall, the Digital Rhetoric Collaborative Book Series, part of the Digital Culture Books imprint of the U-M Press, had the pleasure of publishing its first book, Digital Samaritans  by Jim Ridolfo of the University of Kentucky. This summer, it welcomed a second, Making Space: Writing Instruction, Infrastructure, and Multiliteracies, edited by James P. Purdy and Dànielle Nicole DeVoss of Duquesne University and Michigan State University, respectively. The editors write in their Introduction that “Over the past ten years or so, the infrastructures of writing have captured the attention of writing studies scholars, researchers, and teachers. This is not particularly surprising given the spaces in which most writing happens today: on screens, within interfaces, under proprietary (and, more and more, local and/or open source) programs, and across networks.” Purdy and DeVoss’s volume builds on these conversations by offering the first collection of work addressing issues of space design meant to inform decisions by the stakeholders teaching and administering in these writing center and writing program spaces. Chapters in the collection “address how architectural and technological needs […] are met and how they are rationalized within specific institutional contexts.”

book_cover_draft2

Making Space is also the first DRC book to be simultaneously published in two forms – as an interactive webtext on the DRC site and an enhanced PDF on the U-M Press site. As the editors note in their Preface, this is a “rhetorical and strategic” decision on the part of the Press and the DRC to maximize sustainability and accessibility as well as interactivity. Stay tuned in January for our next dual-platform digital book, Rhizcomics: Rhetoric, Technology, and New Media Composition by Jason Helms of Texas Christian University.

Digital Rhetoric Collaborative News!

drc-award

Sweetland’s Digital Rhetoric Collaborative was recently awarded the Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award at the 2016 Computers and Writing conference.

The Computers and Composition Michelle Kendrick Outstanding Digital Production/Scholarship Award recognizes the creation of outstanding digital productions, digital environments, and/or digital media scholarship. It acknowledges that any single mode of communication, including the alphabetic, can represent only a portion of meaning that authors/designers might want to convey to audiences. This award recognizes the intellectual and creative effort that goes into such work and celebrates the scholarly potential of digital media texts and environments that may include visuals, video animation, and/or sound, as well as printed words. Read more about the Michelle Kendrick award.